042912 - Aeroskobing to Marstal via Svenborg

Thursday 26th April to Sunday 29th April




After a few enjoyable days in Aeroskobing we headed north to Svenborg. The weather here seems to go in a cycle sunshine, rain and wind, fog and no wind back to sunshine again. That cycle can happen over three days or all in the same day.

The sail to Svenborg saw two challenges - a 7 mile narrow and shallow channel and a 33 meter bridge to negotiate. Given that we have a mast that requires about 32 meters of clearance it was going to be uncomfortably close! Thankfully we negotiated both without incident, particularly the bridge. Svenborg Harven proved to be an expensive place to stay after Aeroskobing, perhaps good preparation for the Mediterranean. Everything was metered, our berth, our water consumption and our power. Not good when you are running the heater and taking on water as we are still awaiting parts for the watermaker. Its location to town however like Aeroskobing was totally central so no complaints really.

The town has a long history in shipbuilding and we were fortunate to wander into the yard where several old ships were under repair preparing for relaunch this coming season. Svenborg also saw the first and only time to date its been warm enough to sit in the cockpit for sundowners, but of course we didnt last long as the sun was out but the temperature was still struggling to get above 12 degrees.

From Svenborg we took the long way around to Marstal sailing on the outside of Langeland. Of course the wind was on the nose and the temperature somewhat brisk so it was a long 80 mile day. Having the gunnels in the water provided an interesting site from the saloon - felt like we were in a glass bottom boat watching the water go by!

We have been in Marstal for three nights. The intention had been to set sail this morning but wind forecasts of up to 40 knots made us rethink our stay. Marstal is another town steeped in Maritime history and we visited the local museum where there must be several hundred model ships and equally as many boats in bottles. Andrew just couldn't figure out how to get out with one of the blocks - there were so many we were sure they wouldn't miss one. Though postage may be a problem.

As I write this blog the wind has finally abated to about 20 knots and for the first time in 24 hours Katherine is almost level. Doesn't help that we have had a 50 foot steel boat rafted up to us pressing us into the wall - welcome to the Baltic and the world of rafting.

Tomorrow we head northeast towards Ystad in Sweden on our way to Bornholm.

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© SV Katherine 2017      Cover Photo: Katherine on Anchor Faro Portugal with Askari of Australia